Nightlight

When I was a little girl growing up, I always remember my parents home and grandparents home with a nightlight. What I cannot remember is where the fear of darkness ever came into play in my life to require such a thing. Granted I am the oldest and possibly the light was also there to serve another purpose for younger siblings? The few memories that I do have is making sure that if my bedroom light had to be turned off id get a running start so that I could jump through the air and land in my bed quickly. Was there some sort of black hole under there? A monster hiding that could have grabbed my feet or ankles if I would have casually walked over and just got into bed like a normal person? LOL.. silly thinking back on it all now.

This weekend I packed up my bags and headed to Seoul for a ladies weekend. This was a much delayed and much awaited birthday celebration for my dear friend Mary. While we were at lunch we were discussing her two little ones and their fright associated with the dark night sky. It ended up that they were outside at night due to an appointment. This sense of the unknown scared them, made them want to hurry, run, get to the car. How sweet these two are!

What about you? Did you grow up with a nightlight? Do you remember if you feared the night or dark?
Thankfully like most childhood things, the fear of silly things fizzles out as you grow up. Can I get an Amen? Or else Mary and I wouldn’t ever of had the chance to get out in Seoul at night to see the annual lantern festival. This was my second time getting to see the parade in Seoul since living here. It never gets old! So many beautifully lit lanterns. Some being carried, some being pushed, some being pulled, some even motorized. The cityscape of high-rises in the backdrop gave little light to the parade, but the millions of lanterns that came down the street in masses were what really lit the area up.

Rewind to earlier in the afternoon, sorry you know I am a cake first kind of gal.

We strolled around the Bukchon Hanok Village (북촌한옥마을). This was a first for both Mary and I. I wasn’t sure what to expect, only going off of travel books and lists that I had made and am determined to eventually concur while we live abroad.

Bukchon Hanok Village is home to hundreds of traditional houses called ‘hanok’ that date back many, many, years. These are private homes still lived in by Korean residents. They are absolutely charming! The entire area had tugged at my heartstrings. Such quaint little shops, hidden coffeehouses, tea houses, bakeries, vintage shops, etc. The best part of all, get ready for this, you can do a hanok stay! Yes! They had all kinds of different posts on the web if you are interested in such a thing. Hmm… perhaps an anniversary trip that is approaching? Don’t just take my word for it, get out and see them for yourselves! Okay, you can check out the photos below too.

Directions:

Anguk Station (Seoul Subway Line 3), Exit 2.

Go straight for about 300m to arrive at Bukchon Hanok Village. (Two information booths in area for a map).

I am such a foodie! You couldn’t possibly think that i’d sign off without letting you take a gander at some of our good eats did you? Check out that Potbingsoo! Ohhhh yeses… Summer is finally here!

Backpackbees

2 comments

    1. Thank you! It was absolutely beautiful at night in downtown Seoul, the village was a lot of fun too. All great places to take you guys when you visit 😉 wink wink.

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